Woman Tries To Get Her Ring Resized -- Only To Learn That Her Fiancé Bought a Fake

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Woman getting engagement ring
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When it comes to getting that perfect engagement ring, people sure run the gamut when it comes to their expectations. Although some would-be brides fill Pinterest boards full of ideas for their partners, others don't care much about the bling and would rather be surprised. But imagine the surprise of one woman who thought she got a genuine Tiffany & Co. engagement ring from her fiancé, only to later learn it was a total fake.

  • The proposal happened on Christmas Day, and according to the bride, it was "perfect."

    Her ring came inside a signature blue Tiffany's box, she recently shared in a post on Reddit. So naturally, she thought it was the real deal.

    "I was literally over the moon with it," she recalled. "I told him he shouldn’t have spent this much on me but he said he wanted to get me the blue box."

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  • There was just one problem: The ring was a bit too big to begin win, and she recently lost some weight.

    So, she went to Tiffany's to have it resized. But when she got there, her "dream proposal" started to fall apart.

    "I go into Tiffany’s to have it sized because my friend told me I should only have them work on my ring," she wrote. "They take the ring and ask my for my fiancé’s info to look up in their system. They can’t find it and she takes the ring in the back."

  • Finally, the manager had to break the news to her: The ring wasn't from Tiffany's.

    In fact, there was no engraving on the inside of the band, which is one of the telltale signs of a genuine Tiffany's ring.

    But the incident didn't ring alarm bells right away. At first, the woman gave her fiancé the benefit of the doubt. 

    "I go home and my first thought is that he probably bought it preloved and he got duped," she explained.

  • It turns out, however, her fiancé was trying to dupe her all along.

    When he got home from work, she asked him where he got the engagement ring.

    "He said Tiffany and Co. ... [and] I flat out asked him if he got it used online and it was okay if he did," she recalled. 

    But instead, he doubled-down on his claim. "He flipped out and said no it’s new from the store," she wrote.

  • At this point, the woman had to come clean and say she already knew it was a fake.

    Instead of admitting anything, her fiancé flipped out and accused her of snooping!

    "I was firm and said no I just wanted it resized and they told me it’s not from their company," she wrote. "He said that they’re wrong and he got it there."

    By now, things were getting heated, and her fiancé told her that she should have told him that the ring needed to be resized and he would have brought it back to Tiffany's himself. By taking it on her own, he claimed, it felt as though she was "going behind his back." 

    "I’m confused by this because I thought it was a simple task that I didn’t need him for," the bride posted. "Anyway, he won’t really talk about where he got the ring and is only saying that he will size it and took the ring."

  • The comments section quickly went NUTS over the woman's post, with people claiming her fiancé was clearly up to no good.


    "Put the wedding plans on hold until he comes clean," one commenter advised. "It’s one thing to screw up and accidentally buy a fake. It’s another thing for him to ...

    1. Lie about where he got it when directly asked,

    2. Double-down on the lie when you give him evidence of his lie,

    3. Gaslight you about things you know to be true,

    4. Jump to accusing you of things out of the blue, and

    5. Tell you that you need his permission to size your ring.

    At least if you call off the engagement, you can give back the ring without worrying about losing anything of value," the person continued.

    Another person agreed, writing "it's not a good idea to enter a marriage when the very first step of it was a lie."

    Yet another person called the thing "super shady."

    "I would use this as an opportunity to evaluate -- how is he with money generally, has he ever lied about financial stuff before (and this counts), does he tend to spend big on himself and never on you?" the person asked. "Just things to evaluate to see how this fits into his pattern."

  • Then things got even worse -- when the bride actually did do a little snooping.

    After a bit of investigating, she learned that her fiancé had gotten the ring for a steal -- on Amazon.

    WOAH boy.

    Although we would never usually condone snooping, in this case it might not have been the worst idea.

    "I checked his tablet this morning when he went to work to see if I can find any information," she shared. "His Amazon was still logged in and found my ring on there, actually two of them. The first one was bought December 2 and then another one a size smaller last night."

    If you're wondering just how much he got the ring for, please brace yourself: He scored the knock-off for less than $10!

    "I’m beyond words," the woman wrote. "Not that it’s not a Tiffany ring, but that he was playing me with a $6 ring. After he purchased a mini bar and an OLED TV for himself on Black Friday. I can’t believe I went into Tiffany’s with a $5 rip off. I’m mortified."

  • At the end of the day, it was the cover-up -- not the crime -- that was the real problem.

    When the woman called to confront her fiancé about what she found, she told him as much. She didn't care about the price; it was his lies that had been hurtful.

    "He started crying saying that he felt like he needed to get me the best but he couldn’t afford it," she recalled. "I said, 'But you could afford the $3K on your stuff.'"

    (She has a point there!)

    "I told him I didn’t even need the Tiffany ring," the woman added. "That he could have bought a $200 14k gold band at Macy’s. Instead he spent money on a box and two fake rings."

  • As for that iconic blue box ... 

    "He then confessed and said that he got the box from his friend that proposed with a Tiffany ring years ago and the wife doesn’t need the boxes," the bride relayed. 

    As you might imagine, that didn't go over so well. 

    "I hung up," she said. "I texted him I need some space and time and I’m going to go stay at a hotel to just chill for a day."

    It sounds like these two need to have a major discussion about their priorities before actually getting married (if that's even happening now). Because if he's going to lie at the proposal, who knows what could happen after they say "I do."

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