pythonSo let's say it's 3:30 in the morning and suddenly you wake up because your cat is hissing like a maniac. So you follow the sound of the agitated kitty into your 2-year-old daughter's bedroom and HOLY MOTHER OF GOD there's a six-foot python wrapped around her arm. What do you do?! What do you do?!?!

Well, if you're 22-year-old Tess Guthrie of Australia, you grab that big bad snake around the head -- which, unfortunately, causes the snake to bite 2-year-old Zara on the hand three times -- but that's kind of okay, because pythons aren't venomous (they kill their prey by squeezing the life out of it and swallowing it whole), so ultimately grabbing that python by the head was a smart move. Then a snake removal service came and took the python away and little Zara was treated briefly at the hospital for the bites and all's well that ends well, right?

But there is another piece of this story, involving the manner in which Tess decided to dispose of the snake, that strikes some parents as rather ... odd. See, apparently Tess allowed the snake remover to release the python back into the wild ... only three miles from her house. Personally, I would find that a bit too close for comfort, I think. Personally, I would probably prefer to smash the python's head in with a baseball bat, which I think is actually a fairly normal maternal reaction to seeing one's offspring nearly killed by a wild animal, but what do I know?

According to the snake remover, Tex Tillis, the python wasn't even trying to do the child any harm:

"The snake, not in any way, shape, or form, had intended to eat the baby -- it was trying to have a group hug."

See, what do I know? All this time I thought pythons were dangerous, and it turns out they're just as cuddly as grizzly bears or lions. Perfectly appropriate playmates for any small child.

Uh, sure. Sleep lightly, Tess and Zara. And make sure that cat sticks around.

Would you want the python released into the wild so close to home if you were this mom?

 

Image via Roberto Verzo/Flickr