student eye infectionNo matter how many times you tell your child that flossing is necessary, or that buckling up is a non-negotiable, or that texting and driving is a death wish, the most you can do is hope that they heed your advice. You can't stand over them and force them to do these things, right? It's a shame, too, because sometimes they think they know best, that they're invincible, when, really, they're not. Take this teenager. She didn't change her contacts like she was supposed to and ended up with an eye-eating parasite that almost left her blind.

Ashley Hyde, 18, is a high school senior in Florida. When she complained about some pretty severe eye irritation and blurred vision, doctors saw that there was a problem, but couldn't pinpoint the issue. They ended up having to drill into her eyeball and take a scraping (oh god someone hold me) and from there discovered that a microscopic parasite that's usually found in water had latched on to her contact lens and spread all the way across it. 

She'll be OK, but it almost made her go blind. Doctors believe that after four months of weekly visits, Ashley will be back to normal.

Listen. I don't want to say you should go ahead and show Ashley's gross eye picture to your teens and remind them that they're not immune to such trauma, but you might want to do just that. Maybe blow up the picture to poster size and place it on their pillow? Just a thought.

Because I can remember not that long ago when I was a teen (OK, longer ago than I'm willing to admit, but still) and I thought nothing would ever happen to me. Everyone thinks that when they're in high school!

Point is, teens: if you don't do the little annoying shit like clean your contacts or change your oil or wear sunscreen, things could go really wrong. Let our poor Ashley here serve as an accidental reminder that sometimes that thing going wrong is a retina-chomping bug. And that's not fun for anyone.

How do you drive this point home to your teen?

 

Photo via glovalviralvideonews/YouTube