Encouraging Girls to Spend 'Daddy's Money' Is All Kinds of Wrong (VIDEO)

Rant 16

Daddy's MoneyNeed further proof that it's tough out there when you're parenting a daughter? Moms and Dads got great news yesterday that there are now superhero undies for girls too! I was so high off the ground from that one that I should have known the landing was going to hurt something awful. And it did ... that's when someone forwarded me a Rants From Mommyland blog post about Daddy's Money Shoes.

Haven't heard of them? You're lucky. Parent company Skechers is advertising to our kids on TV channels like The Hub, trying to draw them in with some seriously backward thinking about the father/daughter relationship.

The premise? Our girls should get Daddy to buy her shoes because, like, OMG, they're so awesome and they come with a SECRET two-inch wedge that Daddy won't even notice until he's forked over the cash.

Get your barf bags ready and watch:

Retch.

My problem with the Daddy's Money Shoes premise is the same one I have with the father/daughter relationship as it's portrayed on so many TV commercials and TV shows. It supports this notion that a girl's job is to manipulate her father, a father's job to do his daughter's bidding.

Yes, my husband is head over heels for his little girl. No, he doesn't abandon all sane thought when she so much as bats her eyelashes. His REAL job is to be her parent. He has to set boundaries, to say no when necessary.

That's in part because that's how you co-parent; each adult in the parental unit needs to pull their weight. But it's also my husband's responsibility to model the relationship she will one day have with other men. She can't think that she needs to spend her life getting one over on the men in her life. Nor should she expect men to fall at her feet.

As Rants From Mommyland points out in her own takedown of the shoe company's troubling ads, "This is NOT how we teach girls and young women to get what they want."

We don't want them thinking that instead of working for things, they just go ask Daddy (or whatever other man they have in their life in the future). And we don't want them thinking that the best way to get what they want is to lie (note that "secret" wedge that the girls are giggling about in the ad).

What do you find most troubling about these ads?

 

Image via Daddy's Money/YouTube

family, issues