Hiring a Makeup Artist for Your Daughter Isn't Spoiling Her

Mom Moment 10

make-up artistFor most moms, the day their daughter starts dabbling in makeup is one they fear because it represents the entrance to the teen years. A dash of lip gloss and a flutter of mascara-coated lashes are signs their girls are growing up. I am not one of those moms. I am terrified of the day my daughter begins wearing makeup for another reason entirely.

I have no clue how to teach her to actually put on makeup. And I don't want my mom fail to be the reason my kid is the weirdo with the orange line down the side of her jaw. So it's been decided: I will be joining the throng of women taking their tween and teenage daughters to a professional makeup artist.

Am I spoiling her? Not in the least. Trust me, this is one of the smartest mom moves I can make.

I am and have long been something of a "tomboy" type. I keep my hair short. I prefer jeans and a hoodie to heels and a dress. And if you haven't already guessed, I don't spend much time in the beauty aisles. Faced with row after row of skin-tone matching foundations, blushes, and concealers is enough to send me running for the spot with all the candy. In fact, my routine when I go out is thus: eyeshadow primer, eyeshadow, eye liner, done. If my lips have a certain shine to them, it's only because I've just applied the lip balm I buy in bulk to counteract my nervous habit of chewing (and it's got SPF!).

But chances are, my daughter is not going to be like me. Women who do wear makeup are the majority. A full third of ladies have admitted they won't even go outside without something on their faces.

If that's the path she chooses, I have no problem with that. Every woman is different, and I am raising a person, not a carbon copy of myself. But I don't want to be the reason she's getting picked on in the girl's locker room ... or worse, the reason she's crying in the bathroom because she can't figure out how to make the damn eyelash curler actually curl her lashes. Turning to someone else for help is one way I can protect her and arm her with tools she'll need in the future.

When you think about it, hiring someone to teach our daughters the proper way to apply makeup isn't that much more different than hiring any other professional to provide a service that extends beyond our own area of expertise as parents. We pay someone else to teach them to swim or someone else to cut their hair, don't we?

Who will be teaching your daughter how to apply makeup?

 

Image via Regis Andrade/Flickr

issues, puberty, makeup

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KBW2 KBW2

I'll probably do the same- my mom taught me and while she's beautiful, she's not ever really been taught herself. I've watched a YouTube video recently, but I certainly need instruction.

Sinat... SinatrasKitten

I think it's a good move! :)
I've actually been considering hiring one for myself since I can't figure out how to cover these dark circles I started dealing with (after I turned 40)... *sigh*

Melis... Melissa042807

I'll do the teaching, only because I'm a total makeup junkie. :-) I love putting makeup on people and helping them pick out product! 


When I started wearing makeup as a teen, I did it with zero instruction. And I looked TERRIBLE. My mother let me walk around looking awful for a full week before stepping in after my brother loudly proclaimed how bad my makeup looked and I ran crying into the bathroom. She helped me wash my face, went and got her own makeup bag, and taught me how to do a night light, natural makeup look. I gotta give her credit - it was probably making her insane that her daughter looked like Toddlers & Tiaras,  but she knew I wouldn't listen just to her! So she kept her mouth shut and let me learn my lesson. 

nonmember avatar Ashley

I think the "blue eyeshadow" phase is crucial...but in 9th or 10th grade I took my daughter to the free makeup artist day at the Lancome counter and it was perfect. Just enough to show her how to achieve the look she wants and to hear that hydration and sleep will do wonders...and it didn't cost a cent (except for the bronzer she chose)! Heck the makeup counters offer those all the time.

jjsmo... jjsmom252118

The blue eyeshadow phase has been taken over by the "I MUST wear black eyeliner" all the time phase. Every generation has one, mine was (Sad that I still remember the name of it) Cover Girl Frosted Ginger. Orange does NOT look good on all skin tones!! I see pictures now and cringe! Hopefully the make-up counters use a little lighter touch now than they did back in my day, Merle Norman was the "norm" and when I finally saw the amount of make-up a friend actually used to get that look I was astounded. Bare minerals is what my daughter uses and in high school other girls didn't even think she used make-up. I was, and still am I guess, a tomboy, but I have always thought the less the better.(I just cringed again thinking about Frosted Ginger) Stage make-up at the mall just looks silly to me. But most grow out of it as they get a little older and realize they have great skin and have no need to cover it all up until they get to be my age.

jjsmo... jjsmom252118

Oh and sinatras kitten? Try the L'oreal caffeine roller thingy with tint in it, it works pretty well. I gave up on the bare minerals myself a couple of years ago as the powder was sitting in my "wisdom" lines and went to the roller thing and the cover girl stuff with oil of olay swirls in it. There's only so much I can do with a 47 year old face, but they seem to work better than anything else I've found.

mik1of3 mik1of3

As a total tomboy who only wears makeup to work because she has to...(and if her bosses aren't going to be in she DOESNT wear it at all) ...I am the last person to teach my daughter how to wear it.  Luckily, she's a tomboy like me, and doesn't want to.  However, when she had her eighth grade progression ceremony & dance, we brought in my totally girly sister and her daughter, my equally girly niece to the rescue.  They did her hair in an elaborate french braid, and did the entire makeup, complete with smokey eye.
Her first words when I picked her up from the dance?  "Take me home so I get wash this crap off!"


Now, when she gets ready for it, I have offered to take her to our hair stylist for hair & makeup lessons.  Most stylists will give instructions for an hourly rate.  However, she put the kibosh on that idea.  She wants to find a transvestite to teach her how to do her hair and makeup...and to teach her how to dress, walk and talk.  My kid is a swimmer, with the broad shoulders, and is 5'6 with big bones.  She says she wants to learn all the girly stuff ala RuPaul's drag race...because "Momma, they can teach me how to doll myself up, walk, and talk with ATTITUDE!" 

Char_... Char_gal4

Growing up, I had huge, furry eyebrows.  Mom took me to the salon when I was 18 to get them waxed, so it would be easier to keep neat and less painful that just going in.  I freaked and chickened out the first time, but I did get it done.  I think that once or twice going in would be a good bonding experience, and a way to learn.  Personally, I rarely wear makeup.  Most I do is covering problem areas with foundation and some light brown eyeshadow.  Mascara itches, and just bugs me.  If a girl does get some lessons, though, she can learn less IS more!

nonmember avatar kristina

I am a makeup artist and id be happy to help out anyone who needs. Chicago il

nonmember avatar Dc

My step daughter just began wearing makeup at age 11. Her mom bought her childish make up and she's been looking like a clown for weeks. Does anyone have thoughts? I've considered taking her to ultra for a professional to show her how to apply it subtley, and maturely, but her mom is a cosmetologist! Will I be stepping on her toes? The poor kid can't keep looking like Mimi on drew Carey show!

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