scarlett johanssonScarlett Johansson doesn't understand social media. And because she's so pretty, she doesn't have to. When you've got cheekbones and lips like that, you're basically off the hook for anything. Did you know ScarJo doesn't pay taxes?

No, but seriously, let's talk about Scarlett Johansson and her feelings on Facebook and Twitter for a minute here. In a recent interview with Marie Claire (in which, yes, she talks about her divorce from Ryan Reynolds), the actress stated: "All of it drives me crazy. I don't understand this need to 'share.' We almost exploit ourselves in order to feel seen." And I get that. I feel you, Scarlett. I feel you.

Sometimes social media can be amazing, but other times -- a lot of the time, actually -- it's flat-out ridiculous and completely unnecessary. But it doesn't have to be that way! Here are five questions you should ask yourself before posting something online. (Be the change you want to see in the world!)

1. Would I be embarrassed if this was on a billboard? You're having a momentary loss of inhibition, and you think it would be a good idea to post about what a pain in the ass your boss is. Here's an idea: Don't! And furthermore, don't post about how you're wishing you didn't eat that seventh taquito -- too visual. If you wouldn't want it on a billboard, don't post it online.

2. How would you feel seeing your post five years from now? Would you cringe? Laugh? Wonder why on earth you ever posted something so trivial? What you post online stays there forever, so may want to think about the longevity factor.

3. Would you roll your eyes if someone else posted what you're about to post? If you would, odds are others will do the same to you.

4. How would you feel if your kids saw your post -- even if you don't have kids? You may not want kids, but it's a good barometer for what you should and shouldn't post online. AKA, you may want to rethink posting that pic of your tatas to Instagram.

5. Would your post affect any potential jobs? Even if you're gainfully employed right now, there may come a time when you're not. And if your future employer sees something unsavory about you online, could be a deal-breaker. In other words, don't "like" "Racism" on Facebook. And not just because it may affect a possible job, but because that's just dumb.

Do you post everything online?


Image via Stephen Lovekin/Getty