Eddie MurphyAnother day, another bogus celebrity death via Twitter. This time, it was Eddie Murphy, who supposedly died in a snowboarding accident, of all things. Hey, it was only a couple of months ago that Robin Williams died on a mountain in Austria! The bogus story -- yes, folks, Eddie is alive, he's alive! -- originated on a website called Global Associated News. Which is NOT where I'd go if I want to know the global news, because the site appears to be devoid of anything resembling actual news. In fact, the site has already fake killed off other celebs like Charlie Sheen, Jon Bon Jovi, and Tiger Woods.

It's amazing how detailed these fake deaths get. Says the site about Eddie:

The actor & novice snowboarder was vacationing at the Zermatt ski resort in Zermatt, Switzerland with family and friends. Witnesses indicate that Eddie Murphy lost control of his snowboard and struck a tree at a high rate of speed.

Eddie's rep has assured everyone that not only is Eddie alive and kicking, but that he does not snowboard. She assures us that if we ever hear he's died in a future snowboarding accident, we should know it's not true. Good to know.

While these stories are obviously ridiculous and desperate ploys for clicks, one interesting thing does come out of them. A celeb can actually see what people on Twitter would say about him in the event of his death. Kind of like getting to attend your own funeral.

As of this moment, the Global Associated Lies News story is still being spread via Twitter and people are still freaking out, i.e. "Eddie Murphy is dead for real you fool???!!!" I mean, if you're Eddie Murphy, and you're reading Twitter, you'd be kind of flattered, right? It's just too bad Eddie's career is on life support.

While Twitter death hoaxes are one of the most annoying things about the Internet, they were not invented along with social media. After all, it was 1897 when Mark Twain said, "The reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated."

Have you ever been fooled by a celeb death hoax?

 

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