My Favorite Band's Video Stinks & It's Social Media's Fault (VIDEO)

Nicole Fabian-Weber
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a-ha videoI feel 900 years old even writing this, but remember when MTV actually played music videos? Remember when tuning in to channel 716 (or whatever it is by you) meant a delicious, animated treat from a-ha, as opposed to a drunken girl fight on some Real World/Road Rules Challenge?

And then remember when bands started producing rad videos mainly to watch online? ("Bad Romance," 386,000,000 views; "Baby," 560,000,000 views.) Sure, the thrill of waiting for it to come on the TV was gone, but at least we still got to watch some super cool stuff from our favorite artists. Well, I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but that's on its way out, too, because the latest trend in music videos is "crowdsourcing." And it sucks.

What is crowdsourcing? Well, it's basically outsourcing, but with fans. (So, I don't know why it's not called fansourcing.) Instead of spending the time, creativity, and money on making their own videos, bands are having their fans make their videos for them. A winner is picked, fans are gained, money is saved, and the film students who lost will forever refer to the band who held the contest as derivative and trite.

I believe the first band to do this was Enigma. Then, last month, Panic at the Disco -- in conjunction with new video platform, Viddy -- announced they wanted their fans to help them make their next video. Now Swedish band Junip is jumping on the bandwagon.

To me, and who am I, I feel like this is just a cheap ploy to scoop up more fans. It creates the illusion of togetherness and creativity, but really, it's just plain laziness. When I watch favorite bands of mine, I want to see just that -- the bands, and the concept they've come up with. I don't want to see some kid in Iowa farting in his basement on an 8 mm camera and passing it off as art (no offense to Iowa, it was the first state that popped into my head). That kind of stuff is YouTube. The music videos by bands brought a sense of legitimacy to the otherwise lawless, post-Apocalyptic uploaded website. Let's not detract from that.

I understand the goal of every band is to gain more fans, but why not do it the old-fashioned way? Fliers and free beer.

Here's a-ha's "Take on Me" video to get you through this Wednesday:

Do you like the idea of crowdsourcing?

 

Image via YouTube

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