Super Bowl Shouldn’t Be Benefiting Convicted Child Molester

Twisted 1

footballAs if the sports world hasn't had enough child sex abuse scandals to turn our stomachs, the Super Bowl is giving us another one. The New England Patriots have reportedly chosen "Rock and Roll Part II," a song by convicted child molester Gary Glitter, to be played every time they make a touchdown on Sunday.

Pardon me, guys, but haven't you learned anything from the news over the past few months? The world of sports is supposed to be about entertaining the masses with some good old-fashioned competition, but we've been mired down with one sad, sick, depressing story after another from the Penn State/Jerry Sandusky scandal to the Syracuse University abuse cases.

To say we've had enough is an understatement. And yet, here we go again. Glitter has convictions for both child pornography and sex abuse in his past. The latter came for "committing obscene acts" with girls as young as 10 and 11 in Vietnam. He's one sick dude, and it's not like this is "new" news to anyone.

Glitter has become such a controversial figure that Fox hit Glee was criticized heavily for making use of his "Do You Wanna Touch Me?" last year, and the NFL has explicitly banned teams from playing the British rocker's version of the song.

It's too bad they didn't extend that ban to covers. Because although that's just what the Pats are expected to use every time Tom Brady and co. get one into the end zone, Glitter still rakes in cash every time one of his songs is used in any form, and used on the mega-huge forum of the Super Bowl, he'll be making serious bank.

This is hardly the first time the Super Bowl has weathered this particular scandal. It was only two years ago, after all, that child advocates were trying to get The Who axed from the half-time show because rocker Pete Townshend is on the British sex offender registry for accessing child porn. But this year, in the wake of all the sports world has been through, somehow it seems even harder to forgive the Patriots for not being a little more choosey with their theme songs.

How do you feel about letting Glitter make money off the game?

 

Image via juggernautco/Flickr

football, super bowl

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nonmember avatar Shawn

While sports is more commercial than I’d like it to be, I think some actions still need to be considered carefully before being taken. Such a move will no doubt piss many of us off and harm the Superbowl in the long run.

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