Canucks Rioter Gives Us a Reason to Forgive Him (VIDEO)

Nicole Fabian-Weber
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canucks apologyHere are two things I bet you didn't expect to come from the Vancouver Canucks riot: One, a website has been created to identify the people who partook in it; and two, one rioter, apparently racked with guilt, posted a YouTube video of himself apologizing for what he did. Whodda thunk?

The website, CanucksRiot2011, posts photos and videos of looters and asks people to identify them. The images are even given captions like, "Tough guy punches window and young man." This system, started by an unhappy Vancouver fan, is working. One coffee shop alone has filed over 150 lawsuits against people who trashed and stole from their store.

I don't think it's presumptuous to say that the rioters who were drunk on Molson and power are probably crapping their blue, white, and green boxer shorts right now. So what's up with this guy who turned himself in?

The man, Jason Li, was all over the Internet when images of the riots first started surfacing. In fact, there's a pretty iconic, if that's what you want to call it, photo of him standing in front of a smashed store front, arms out-stretched, hockey stick in hand, mouth agape -- not in a shocked way, in an I-just-tore-s**t-up way. It was his Taxi Driver moment.

But now here he is, weeks later, apologizing to the world on the Internet. And his words seem to be genuine. There are no traces of the maniacal weapon-wielding destruct-or he once appeared to be. Only a nerdy Asian dude who seems to have lost a night or two of sleep for what he did. It's kind of great.

Some may say Li is just doing this to clear his name. His face and name were plastered all over the Internet -- and the response to him, understandably, was not a kind one. But I disagree. If you watch the video, Li seems like somebody who was really just swept up in the moment. Maybe it's the glasses, but he doesn't seem like a bad person.

For the hundreds of people who took part in the riots that fateful Stanley Cup night, I'd say we can probably count on both hands how many are actually sorry. And we can probably count on one the people who will post a video admitting this on YouTube.

Check out the video for yourself:

Do you think Jason is sorry?

 

Image via YouTube

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