New Celeb Trend: Mystery Fathers

Amy Kuras
2

mystery daddyHere's a half-serious rule of journalists -- if something happens once, it's interesting, twice, it bears notice, and after three times, it's a trend. So, when Saturday Night Live alum Rachel Dratch announced this week she is pregnant and due in September but didn't disclose the identity of the baby's father, she confirmed the trend of the mystery daddy.

Minnie Driver, who gave birth to son Henry Story Driver in 2008, and Padma Lakshmi, who had daughter Krishna earlier this year, are two other famous single mothers who opted not to tell the world who fathered their children. In Lakshmi's case, Adam Dell, brother of Dell Computers founder Michael, outed himself as the father when he sought visitation rights to his daughter.

I've gotta say, I respect these women for keeping their private lives private. When so many z-listers are total famewhores, practically inviting the media in for the conception of their children, I like that they just choose not to discuss how they became pregnant.

I'm somewhat suspecting for both Dratz (who's 44) and Driver (who was 38 when her son was born) that they may have used sperm donors after hearing their biological clocks tick. And again, good for them for choosing to keep that on the downlow to the media if it's true, although I certainly hope they'd be very open about their choice in their personal lives.

I do think dads are important, very much so. But we don't know if any of these women found themselves pregnant after a brief and tumultuous relationship, or they have a souvenir from a one-night stand, or simply that their partner is a private person and doesn't want to suddenly be photographed everywhere they go. In other words, maybe dad isn't involved because he doesn't want to be, or maybe dad is involved but we just don't know it.

Of course, all speculation is just that, because we don't know unless they tell us, and really, who cares? With the resources of these well-off celebrity mamas, these babies ought to be well-cared-for, and because it likely took some extra effort to get them, it's a good bet they'll be well-loved.

Image via uyen.tran/Flickr

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