Jerry Sandusky Using Joe Paterno's Death for Attention Is Despicable (VIDEO)

Jerry SanduskyAs if we didn't have enough reasons to despise former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky, the man at the center of a child sex abuse scandal just added another one. Just hours after the family of former Nittany Lions Coach Joe Paterno had confirmed the 85-year-old had died of lung cancer, Sandusky was already issuing a statement to the media.

Really? REALLY? He couldn't stay out of the spotlight for 10 minutes so a family could grieve?

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Sandusky, of course, is the man whose scandal humbled college football's best-known coach late last year. It's hardly surprising that today, as the Paterno family mourns, people are already arguing about whether Paterno's involvement in an alleged college cover-up of Sandusky's alleged crimes against young boys tainted his legacy. Some will argue it's the legendary coach's own fault. Others that it comes down to timing.

But isn't that bad enough for the Paternos? Did Sandusky really have to step in -- via a statement issued through his lawyer -- to make sure people know he's sad too?

Let me be clear: I am no fan of the JoePa. Reading the myriad RIP JoePa notes on Facebook yesterday, my first reaction was anger at the people who I knew just a month or two ago had been ripping the coach a new you-know-what in the same social medium.

But Jerry Sandusky's insistence that he insert himself back into the story reeks of the same "pity poor me" attitude that has made it so easy to believe the allegations against him. While children have been claiming they were sexually abused, Sandusky and his lawyers have spent their time ripping the kids to shreds. Apparently they never got the memo that beating up on little kids in the media just makes you look like more of a jerk.

Sandusky and wife Dottie's statement claims to be an expression of sympathy for Joe Paterno's wife Sue. But the fact that it was made at all sounds more like he's once again asking people to think about him, to sympathize with him:

I don't know about you, but I'm not feeling "sad" for the Sanduskys today. Instead I'm feeling even more sympathetic to the Paterno family. Even in death, they're being haunted by Jerry Sandusky.

Do you think it's fair for Jerry Sandusky to weigh in on Joe Paterno's death? Should he have kept his sadness to himself?


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