Dad Forced to Pick Between Unborn Baby & Wife's Life During Tragic Delivery


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On November 30, Frederick Connie was confronted with a choice that no new dad should have to make: saving his wife or saving their unborn baby. So this Colorado dad made the impossible decision and did what he thought his wife, Keyvonne, would want him to do: save their daughter.

  • Keyvonne first went into labor at home, weeks before her mid-January due date.

    Frederick told Fox 31 that after his wife went into labor, he just remembers seeing blood everywhere and they immediately got to the hospital as she hemorrhaged. 

    That's when doctors confronted him with the devastating options: save Keyvonne or save the unborn girl they nicknamed Pooder. “It was either give [Keyvonne] the surgery first and maybe save her life, but you’re going to lose your daughter. Or your daughter can be saved but there’s a chance you might lose your wife,” Frederick told Fox 31.

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  • So Frederick what he thought his wife would want and told doctors to perform an emergency C-section to save their daughter.

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    Pooder, formally known as Angelique Keyvonne Connie, was born shortly after. Although Keyvonne made it through the surgery, she did not live for long. “I’m glad I made that decision because in the end if Keyvonne probably could have survived she would have hated me for the rest of my life because I knew how she felt about kids,” Frederick said.

  • In a matter of minutes, Frederick said his wife's condition rapidly declined. 

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    Keyvonne died hours later -- but lived long enough to see a picture of her beautiful baby girl. “Literally all of her insides just went all over the bed and the floor,” he said. “They tried [to save her] and her heart couldn’t take it. She died before they could even get her to the surgery.”

  • Now, it's just Frederick and Pooder learning how to navigate this new life together.

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    “They got me a room in labor and delivery and I’m the only man to ever have a room in the labor and delivery and the mothers there said it was OK,” he said. "I’m [ignorant] on changing diapers but I’m going to learn. I’m going to be a full-time father to her."

    Frederick explained that as a foster child himself who never really knew his parents, he takes the task of ensuring that Pooder know both her mom and dad very seriously. "For Pooder to have me is a big deal," he said. “I gave her her mom’s name. She’s going to know her mom. I’ll make sure of that.”

  • Pooder is expected to remain in the hospital for several days to weeks as she fights to grow stronger.

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    Frederick will plan his wife's funeral only once Pooder is released from the hospital, according to Fox 31. In the meantime, she's drinking donated breast milk and wearing clothes gifted from loving nurses. 

  • To help with the mounting funeral and medical expenses, Frederick's community is rallying behind him.

    Frederick's boss, Justin Collins, set up a fundraising page on Facebook for the pair and has already raised more than $21,000. "He has always been a hard worker during the time I have known him and always provided for his family," he wrote. "I can't Imagine any more difficult time then this in a person's life. Thank you for anything you feel you can do."

    A local couple who own Taylor Mortuary also offered funeral and cremation services after hearing the Connie family's story.

    "Being a mother, it really moved me because 38 years ago when I had my son I had preeclampsia and toxemia. I was in labor for three days. I almost died as well as my son,” LeQuita Taylor told Fox 31.

    “We’ve had mothers where we’ve buried the baby with the mother. They baby didn’t make it either. So it has not stopped. ... Even with all the high tech and everything, mothers are still leaving a lot of their babies.”