Isabel Celis & Maddie McCann Make Moms Ask: Should We Lock the Windows?

windowThe disappearance of 6-year-old Isabel Celis is becoming a horrible case of deja vu. Five days and counting, and she is still missing and, with every passing day, hope is evaporating a little more. Feels very similar to how everyone felt 5 years and 9 days ago, when 3-year-old Madeleine McCann disappeared from a Portuguese resort. Today, in the midst of the search for Celis, a new photo of Madeleine McCann was released.

Well, didn't that make my mom fears go into overdrive. Two loved little girls from (seemingly) solid families, tucked in one minute and then gone the next. Without a trace. But one similarity around the disappearance of the two girls has me freaking out more than any other and seriously questioning how I put my kids to bed each and every night.

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Read more: Madeleine McCann Could Still Be Alive (VIDEO)

In both the cases of Isabel and Maddie, the bedroom windows appeared messed with. Maddie's mom, Kate, the one who discovered her gone after returning from a restaurant down the road to check on her daughter (still can't believe she'd do that, but ...), found the front door unlocked and the ground level bedroom window open. This leads you to believe that the abductor got in through the window and exited through the front door.

During a search of Isabel's house, police found the screen of her bedroom window knocked out. The window of the bedroom of Lisa Irwin, the 10-month-old who has been missing for months now, also showed signs of tampering.

Read more: Missing 6-Year-Old Isabel Celis' Disappearance From Her Own Bed Is Every Parent's Fear

Deep breath. Child abductions are rare. Child abductions at home are even more rare. Who knows if that's what really happened to Isabel, Maddie, or Lisa. You cannot shield your child from the world or live your life in fear that there's a slim chance they could be abducted.

Duly noted.

But if you have children of your own, you also can't help freaking out a little (or a lot) every time one of these rare cases saturates your consciousness thanks to the media. Because statistics don't mean a darn thing when it's your child or when you imagine it could have been your child.

So why not lower the risk of it happening? Doesn't the benefit outweigh the risk?

Should we all lock our kids' windows at night?


Image via torbakhopper/Flickr

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