Money Talks: The Tool You Need to Save Big on Amazon Purchases

Amazon shopping is a chronic condition, and we all have it. No one can say no to the lure of $10 off and free two-day shipping -- it's just the way life goes. While we don't have the power to help you with that problem, we might be able to help with another: getting the biggest bang for your Amazon buck.

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By that, we mean we think we can help you get the best and biggest deals on the Amazon products you're planning on buying anyway, provided you're cool with waiting. And our trick is this: Amazon price trackers.

Amazon prices tend to fluctuate pretty regularly -- especially in the marketplace where sellers from all over the world can put up their products. It's great for you in the sense that you can usually get great deals. But it's bad for you when you don't know whether you're getting a deal or not.

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Our favorite tracker is camelcamelcamel, and it's absurdly easy to use. You need to make an account (it's free! We wouldn't make you spend money to save money), but once you do so, you'll get access to the Amazon price history of any product on the market. That way, you can see if the price they're asking now is in line with the average ... and wait to buy if not.

Even better, you can sign up for price drop and availability alerts. To do this, you "track" a product with the URL and set a threshold in camelcamelcamel. Then, they'll send you alerts (via email, RSS, or Twitter) when the item drops below your threshold. 

So, for example, if the watch you like (but don't necessarily need ASAP) is currently $120 but you're not really willing to spend more than $100 on it, you can tell camelcamelcamel that. When the price falls below $100 again, you'll get an email and you can snap up the watch while it's still a deal.

On big-ticket items, it's not unusual to save close to $100 with camelcamelcamel. But even on smaller stuff, little saves add up.

 

Graphic via Anne Meadows

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