embroidered brainIt seems like ever since the dawn of time, female sexuality has been treated as not only taboo, but incredibly mysterious. Men act like we're the most complicated beings on the planet, and turning us on is one of the biggest challenges EVER. Although I wouldn't argue that we are complex (a lot more so than guys, in plenty of ways!), I'm not sure why researchers think that understanding our orgasms is on par with rocket science. I do give 'em props for finally giving the "female brain on sex" enough credit to study it.

Recently, Professor Barry R. Komisaruk, PhD, a psychologist at Rutgers University, and Nan Wise, a 54-year-old PhD student and sex therapist, joined forces to create the world's first footage of a female brain during orgasm. They used sequential brain scans of Wise herself -- it's her dissertation, after all! -- and concluded that the orgasm process in us ladies basically looks like a "brain symphony." Woo woo!

This is all very cool, but I worry about how science plans to apply findings like this. Already, it's been reported that the aim of this study was to "uncover what goes wrong in both men and women who cannot reach sexual climax." Uh-huh ... given how hungry the pharmaceutical industry is for a "female Viagra," I wouldn't be surprised if this research is the first step toward attempting (again, as it's been tried recently and failed) to design something like that. If so, it definitely wouldn't be doing women any favors!

Hopefully, I'm just being a healthy skeptic who has seen what happens when drug companies get their hooks in the uber-profitable idea of "female sexual dysfunction." Hopefully, Nan Wise and Dr. Komisaruk are more interested in investigating natural, mind-over-body ways for women and men to achieve orgasm more readily.

After all, there's plenty of research out there echoing what most of us women already know. Most of the time, for most of us, it's not some bizarre brain dysfunction or chemistry issue prohibiting us from the Big O! It's more so stress, distractions, our minds going a mile a minute, or lacking foreplay that leads to the aforementioned things hindering a climax. And it doesn't take a pill to fix any of those things. Strategies like mindful meditation or simply warming up the engine a little bit before going for the full-on road trip would probably work wonders for most women struggling with orgasm. With hope, those are kinds of "Band-Aids" sex researchers will end up exploring as a result of these sexy new MRIs.

Why do you think most women who can't reach climax struggle?

 

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