Fafane CazeEvery time Fafane Caze's 3-year-old son urinated on the floor, police say she would burn him. If he defecated, police say the 21-year-old mother would beat her toddler son with a broom. And on the last day of his life, cops say the Florida mother threw her toddler across the room, then called 911 when his little body slammed into a table and he began struggling for breath.

It's the sort of story that leaves you asking: why? Why did this woman keep this child in her life at all? Why didn't she call social services three years ago and say, "Sorry, I can't do this. Here. He's yours."

Would it have been an easy decision? Surely not, but it's one any of us can respect. It's one that ... in the scheme of things, makes sense.

Emergency workers responding to a 911 call, only to find a toddler whose entire body is marked with evidence of long-standing abuse? That doesn't make sense.

Not when the better options exist.

All 50 states, plus Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, have safe haven laws that allow parents to give up infants. As the children get older, it gets harder, sure, but it's not impossible. Pick up the phone. Call an adoption agency. They will walk you through the process, and at no cost to you.

I make it sound easier than it actually is, I'm sure, but surely it is in comparison to burning a wriggling 3-year-old with a lighter. To looking a defenseless toddler in the eyes and beating him with a broom. To taking an innocent child and throwing them across a room. To torturing them to the point of death. To having to call 911 and report your child is dying ... and be dragged off to jail.

Fafane Caze faces aggravated child abuse charges, and a judge has ruled that a new charge of attempted felony murder should be added. Depending on the autopsy of her son, it could even be changed to murder.

That poor little boy deserved so much better. 

What do you think should be done with Fafane Caze if she's convicted?

 

Image via Miami-Dade Corrections and Rehabilitation Department