Missing Ayla Reynolds' Mom Reveals Horrifying New Details That Scream for an Arrest (VIDEO)

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Ayla ReynoldsThere's more information out about the disappearance of Ayla Reynolds, the toddler who went missing from her home in Maine in late 2011. The girl's mother, Trista Reynolds, has been threatening to release "horrific physical evidence" in the case for nearly a month, but she said she'd hold out until her ex-boyfriend, Justin DiPietro, was scheduled to show up in court on an unrelated charge. But it looks like Trista couldn't wait any longer. And when you hear what she has had to say, it's a wonder she held onto it this long.

The cops apparently told Trista, in detail, about Ayla's blood and saliva being found pretty much everywhere.

Sound gruesome to you?

Imagine being her mom and hearing that ...

In an interview with WCSH, Trista says police showed her photos of Ayla's blood in DiPietro's room. They told her there was blood on his shoes. They told her there was blood in Justin's truck ... mixed with the baby girl's saliva.

And this guy hasn't been arrested?

I know, I know, circumstantial evidence, there is no body, yadda, yadda, yadda.

But this poor woman has all this information at her fingertips ... and nothing to show for it? Her baby girl is presumed dead. She has no body to bury. And there is no one being brought up on charges for it.

As Trista said:

When you have a truck that has blood in it when you have things of Ayla's when you have a whole basement with all different things with blood you tell me you don't have enough to prosecute? I don't want to hear it anymore and I don't believe it.

I won't presume to know what the police need to actually build a case here or why they aren't charging Justin with something, ANYTHING ... even child endangerment. Maybe he really is innocent. Maybe there are just too many roadblocks that my Law & Order police training hasn't taught me about standing in their way.

But this whole sad ordeal does make you wonder how much information should be shared with victims' families? On the one hand, I'd like to think that they should get everything. It's their loved one; they have a right to know.

On the other, I wonder if too much information doesn't just make it harder for the families, at least in cases where the police can't make an arrest, where there is no movement? It only leaves these poor families struggling, leaves them to turn to the media and make a plea for someone to force the cops' hands.

Whether that can really be done is, of course, in the hands of said police and the prosecutors too. They know why Justin DiPietro isn't being charged with anything (aside from the unrelated domestic violence charge that will land him in court later this month). But this plea is certainly powerful ... and it could cause a lot of headaches for them.

Listen to Trista:

Do you think she's right? Should the cops do something?

 

Image via Bring Ayla Home

child abuse, crime