Disgusting Decal of Bound & Gagged Woman Designed to Bring in New Customers (PHOTO)

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Now in what the heck were they thinking news, a Texas sign company has created quite the controversy by offering a truck decal depicting a kidnapping victim. The photographic image features a woman lying on her side, bound and tied, her blonde hair obscuring her face. The decal, which is meant to be slapped on the back of a tailgate, is incredibly realistic.

Hornet Signs, the company that put this out there, says that it’s meant to be an optical illusion, and they had no idea the amount of negative attention they’d receive!

"I wasn't expecting the reactions that we got, nor was it really anything we certainly condone or anything else," said Hornet Signs owner Brad Kolb. "But it was just something ... we had to put out there to see who notices it."

The sad part is that the publicity stunt seems to have worked -- Kolb claims that decal orders have increased since the controversy hit. Because nothing says, “Buy my product!” quite like making light of kidnapping victims and/or human trafficking.

With sickos like Ariel Castro in the news, you can bet the police aren’t too happy about the stunt either. The image is so lifelike that they’ve received a number calls from people afraid for the woman’s life. What a waste of time and resources for law enforcement, who could be out, you know, rescuing real victims.

While most people seem to be shocked and sickened by the decal, the company has received some support. One person said, “This American business owner has a decal that made the news. Like it or not, it works.”

I’m all for entrepreneurship and the free market, but geez Louise, can we please draw a line somewhere and keep a modicum of respect for our fellow human beings? There’s shock value, and then there’s just plain gross.

What do you think about the ‘kidnapping victim’ decal and the company that created it?


Image via News 10/Facebook

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