Aaron SchaffhausenA dad who killed his three daughters in a twisted revenge plot against his ex-wife thought he'd get out of prison with an insanity defense. Good news: it didn't work. Aaron Schaffhausen won't ever see the light of day again. A Wisconsin judge handed down not one, not two, but three life sentences this week.

And no, Schaffhausen won't have a chance at parole.

Thank.

Goodness.

You know what this means?

It means that each of these children meant something, means something to the courts, that each child's death is being avenged, not lumped in with her sisters.

As Judge Howard Cameron, who chose the maximum sentence available under Wisconsin law for Schaffhausen, explained, he wanted to show "each child is so important."

Oh, and it also means Schaffhausen's play to get himself out of prison by pleading guilty by reason of insanity rather than not guilty (his initial plea) didn't work. He's still going to pay, REALLY pay for being a monster.

Think three life sentences are overkill? Isn't one enough? Maybe from a legal standpoint, yes, but when you consider the crimes he committed, it sounds just right to me.

This so-called dad arranged for an unscheduled visit with his children, then he slit each child's throat, tucked them into bed, and set the house on fire. It wasn't until after it was too late to save the girls that Schaffhausen then called ex-wife Jessica and told her "you can come home now" and told her that her daughters were dead.

Now you see why I called him a monster. I wasn't hyperbolizing.

The scary thing is, this monster could have gotten just 20 years in prison followed by supervised release.

He could have walked free.

That he won't is a win for the girls' mother, for their memories.

Of course, life sentences, with or without parole are not nearly as good as having his three daughters alive and well and doing what little kids are supposed to do. But in light of what he did to 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie, and 5-year-old Cecilia, this sentence is pretty darn good news.

What do you make of the sentence? Enough? Too much?

 

Image via St. Croix County Sheriff's Office