preschoolWhen it comes to deviant actions, sometimes minors should be exempt. For instance, if a 13-year-old, who's come from a broken home, gets into a fist-fight, he or she should be given a little leeway. Is it right? Of course not. But what a fist-fighting 13-year-old who comes from a broken home needs more than anything is help. The root of the problem needs to be determined, and although punishment should be in order, they don't necessarily need to be kicked out of school and sent to jail. However, when a 13-year-old rapes a 4-year-old -- twice -- they need to be treated like an adult. Or, at the very least, they need to be banned from returning to the same school district their victim is in.

That's insane.

Diana Hamm is upset, claiming that a 13-year-old boy who's "almost 200 pounds" raped her 4-year-old grandson on two occasions. "It was quite brutal," Hamm said. "We certainly would have never seen it coming." The suspect plead guilty to a first degree felony for a rape that reportedly took place in the bathroom, and a rape that took place on the gym floor. The sexual assault was caught on school surveillance cameras, and the teen was sentenced to two years probation in January. But guess what? Now he's back in school -- in the same district the poor victim is in.

Hamm feels that the penalty is not suffice for the crime, but the thing that upsets her the most is that teen is back in the same school district as her toddler grandson, who's now undergoing therapy. "Unfortunately, the way it's setup, they actually get more protection than the victims themselves," Hamm said.

The juvenile justice system is designed to give young people a second chance -- and that's great. In some cases. In the case of a teenager who sexually abused a child twice -- sorry. I don't think a second chance is in order. 

Clearly, this teenager is deeply disturbed and needs help -- and he should get it. But he should be getting it out of the public school system. Or maybe even in jail. This innocent 4-year-old is now scarred for life. And if it happens to another child, we'll know it could have been prevented.

What do you think of this?

 

Image via LindaH/Flickr