New York City is still reeling from the story of the man who was pushed onto the subway tracks by a deranged drifter -- and the seemingly cold-hearted response of those who witnessed it. One man took photos of the man's doomed last moments, but didn't help him from the tracks. One of those photos very controversially ended up on the cover of the New York Post. It is truly one of the more horrific photos I have ever seen. But now here comes a better story. Last night, reportedly a man fell onto the tracks and was rescued by a Good Samaritan.

It all started around 10:30 p.m. in a downtown Manhattan station. A witness said that she suddenly heard a thud and then people were yelling and "panicking." The witness, a journalist, said that she saw a man sitting dazed on the tracks and people were shouting, "Help him! Help him!"

Suddenly, the woman says she saw another man on the tracks, who had presumably hopped down to help the man. "You could see the lights of the incoming train," she told the New York Post. "It was horrifying. It was like the other day all over again."

People began waving and yelling at the oncoming train, much like they did with the train that ran over Ki Suk Han and killed him. But this time, the train was able to stop in time. Both men were lifted from the tracks, to applause from bystanders. Now, this is a much more heartwarming story than the first one.

People being pushed onto subway tracks by strangers is rare -- the last one in New York was Kendra Webdale in 1999. But people falling onto the tracks is downright common. Last year, 40 people were killed by subways. Most people fall because of health problems -- and many are people who faint because they haven't eaten in the morning

No word yet on what caused this latest man to fall, but thank goodness he had a guardian angel there to help him. And that the train driver was able to stop in time, or perhaps both of them would have been injured or killed.

While we all like to think we'd be a subway hero, the fact is not all of us are physically able to lift a grown man back up onto a platform or even drag one to the side.

Here's one subway hero who saved a stranger in 2009. He tells Anderson Cooper that people "shouldn't judge" and has some fascinating insight on what it really takes to perform this feat.

Do you think you would jump to the tracks to save a stranger?

Image via Flowizm/Flickr