Mayan Apocalypse Must Be Real if NASA Is Talking About the End of the World

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ApocalypseEven NASA has started to chatter about the upcoming supposed Mayan Apocalypse, so maybe it's not just the crazy-pants ramblings of ancient-astrology aficionados? (Actually, yes it is. It very much is.) The year's End of the World prediction has become such a talked-about issue that NASA says it gets emails and letters from people who worry that the world as we know it really is going end on December 21, 2012. On the Mayan calendar, that date marks the end of a calendar cycle called the 13th b'ak'tun.

Now, Mayan scholars say there's no reason to believe this date predicts anything of the sort, but the conspiracy-mongers of the world say some cosmic event will end all life on Earth that day. Why would NASA comment about something like this?

It's for the children.

NASA officials are worried that the fear-mongering is actually freaking out impressionable kids and teens, and they worry some may even plan to commit suicide to avoid the apocalypse.

NASA's so on top of it they've compiled lists debunking Mayan Apocalypse myths. But where did this idea actually come from?

The story started with claims that Nibiru, a supposed planet discovered by the Sumerians, is headed toward Earth. This catastrophe was initially predicted for May 2003, but when nothing happened the doomsday date was moved forward to December 2012. Then these two fables were linked to the end of one of the cycles in the ancient Mayan calendar at the winter solstice in 2012 — hence the predicted doomsday date of December 21, 2012.

Well, that makes perfect sense. Not.

NASA says everyone should chill out. There are no rogue planets hurling toward Earth, so we can all calm down and stop freaking each other out. There also won't be freakishly devastating solar flares, and we won't be wiped out by an asteroid. We also don't have to worry about the Earth's magnetic field abruptly shifting, or about being instantaneously sucked into the black hole at the center of the Milky Way.

Yes, these are all things people are actually afraid might happen. Are they all that far-fetched? Sure, being sucked into a black hole we might see coming, but they don't all sound out of the realm of possibility. What if there really is something they're not telling us?

Do you believe the world will end on December 21?

 

Image via kevin dooley/Flickr

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