Debate: Do Romney's '47 Percent' Remarks Affect Your View of Him?

FlickrIt's no secret that Mitt Romney has had trouble connecting with voters, both Republican and otherwise. Perhaps that's why his "47-percent" remark has gotten so much attention. Just when Romney seemed to be convincing at least some voters that he can relate to average Americans, these comments seemed to put him right back where he began.

Was this simply a verbal misstep on Mitt's part? Were his remarks taken out of context? Or were they a sign of what we could expect from Romney as president? We're getting our political bloggers' takes on the subject this week, and asking them to address the following questions:

As a mom, how do you feel about Romney's 47% remark? How does this reflect on his attitude toward working moms, mothers in poverty, single moms, and stay-at-home moms? Do you feel that Romney as president would have moms' interests in mind?
 
What do you think?

These have been dark days for Mitt Romney. Polls taken since the "47-percent" remark was made public show that Obama's lead against Romney has widened in key swing states. A Reuters/Ipsos poll  released last week showed that 59-percent of respondents “felt Romney unfairly dismissed almost half of Americans as victims.” Forty-three percent “viewed Romney less favorably” after watching the video.

Romney's more relaxed campaign calendar also has received some unwelcome attention. Notable Republicans have slammed Romney recently for not campaigning enough, including Bill Kristol, who yesterday on Meet the Press called Romney a "faker" and the "least popular" candidate ever. And some pundits say the Romney campaign is leaning too heavily now on Ann to "humanize" her husband, and try to fix the public's perception of him.

How do his remarks make you feel, as a woman and a mother? Do they affect your opinion of Romney, and the job he'd do as president? We'll be hearing from our political bloggers on the matter all week long. In the meantime, what do you think?

 

Image via Marc Nozell/Flickr

2012 election, mitt romney