kangarooAn Australian woman says that a kangaroo stalked her for two days and then viciously attacked.

Certain animal assaults never catch us by surprise. Bears -- when we camp out in the woods, we invade their home. Those so-called domesticated chimpanzees -- they call them wild animals for a reason. But a cute, pouchy roo!?!

So when I first heard New South Wales mom Kirrily McWilliam's claim, I thought it another, "The dingo ate my baby." I didn't buy it. But turns out it's totally true.

The growling, gray kangaroo watched her through the backyard fence before busting through and attacking the family's huge mastiff. McWillimas called the National Parks and Wildlife Service several times but go no response. Then, a day later, the same kangaroo came after her as she picked up her daughter from the school bus.

The marsupial charged from the driveway. Pounding and scratching the mom, it left a huge 12-inch gash on her back. "It was lucky it was cool weather and I had two layers of clothing, otherwise it could have been worse," she told The Daily Telegraph.

It didn't stop there. The kangaroo later approached her husband in the backyard but he stopped an attack by wildly waving a shovel. Frightening. In Australia, where they are as common as deer are in the US, these attacks aren't so rare. 

Around the same time, a crazed kangaroo went after a group of children and a pregnant woman at a school yard, and in January, a 7-year-old was playing at a campground when one pounced on her

For most of us, the closest we ever get to these animals is on the other side of a glass window at the zoo. We never think of them as scary, but clearly kangaroos are smarter (it did stalk her, remember) and more dangerous than we give them credit for.

Did you know kangaroos could be so aggressive?

 

Image via Subhash Chandrar/Flickr