William "Clyde" Gibson is a possible serial killer in Indiana who is charged with killing three women -- Christine Whitis, Karen Hodella, and Stephanie Kirk. But to those who knew him, he was just a church going, good guy.

The remains of 35-year-old Kirk were found in Gibson's backyard, just weeks after the young mom went missing. Though he hasn't been convicted, many who knew him are obviously shaken up by the idea that someone so potentially lethal walked among them unseen for so long.

But isn't this always the way it is?

By all accounts, Gibson was a loving member of his church, if not an entirely present one in recent months after his mother fell ill.

It's one of the scariest parts of stories like these. We never really know who our neighbors are even when we think we do. Even the most seemingly pious person can be harboring a deep, dark secret.

It's part of what makes a show like Dexter compelling or makes us want to read about killers like Ted Bundy or John Wayne Gacy, all of whom live such seemingly normal, upstanding lives.

The people who are monsters on the outside aren't nearly as compelling as those who hide it behind a clean and good exterior. If they can be evil, can't anyone? Could the neighbor we think is merely overly nice actually be waiting to hurt us? Isn't it possible?

It's too scary to believe or think. No one wants to believe they could know a person who would be capable of such depraved acts. No one wants to believe that a person they know could be devoid of all feeling or emotion and could kill like an animal.

Gibson may be innocent. After all, innocent until proven guilty and all that. But the concept is the same. The people like Bundy and Gacy walk among us and seem normal. They may have families and go to church and somewhere, deep inside, harbor depraved and evil fantasies that would scare us all.

It's almost too frightening to believe.

Do you ever think about these things with people?

 

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