California Porn Condom Law Will Ruin More Than Just Porn

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Earlier this month, a new law went into effect in Los Angeles mandating condom usage for adult film stars. Yup, California is now 'policing the porn business.' The law is intended to protect the actors and actresses from contracting any sexually transmitted diseases. In 2004, five people in the California porn industry contracted HIV, prompting a voluntary 60-day shutdown by the studios. 

What happened to ‘my body, my choice’? Porn star Kayden Kross told Fox Business Network’s John Stossel, “... a third party stepped in and created, essentially, a crisis that wasn’t there.” She also pointed out that the studios require all their actors to test every 28-30 days, and they do so without any law requiring it.

Adult film stars are adults, free to make their own decisions. They don’t go into that line of work without understanding the potential consequences, and that’s a risk they’re willing to take. Their decisions, their bodies, their choices. 

In the wake of the condom mandate, many of the Los Angeles-based studios have threatened to leave the Golden State and relocate in Arizona. So now the law is not only violating the personal freedoms of individuals, it’s also driving business out of a state that is losing business like my dryer loses socks. 

They might need to find somewhere else to go, because Arizona has some pretty strict pornography laws. Maricopa County Bill Montgomery says his office is ready to prosecute anyone that breaks those laws. He says: 

Under Arizona law, anyone paid to appear in a pornographic movie may be guilty of the crime of prostitution, which carries mandatory jail time as well as the possibility of other penalties ... Arizona law precludes the establishment of a 'pornography industry' to any degree such as that present in California.

The whole thing might be a moot point anyway, because the LA City Attorney’s Office has not been willing to commit the resources necessary to "inspect" porn sets to make sure the new law is being followed. I’d love to see that guy’s business card ... “Joe Schmoe -- Condom Inspector.” 

For now the law seems to be a symbolic one, but I agree with Free Speech Coalition executive director Diane Duke, who said upon its passage:

Government regulation of sexual behavior between consenting adults is, and has always been, a bad idea. The government has no business in our bedrooms -- real or fantasy.

What do you think? Is a condom law a good or bad idea?

 

Image via Kain Road Cul de Sac/Flickr

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