The campaign for Obama 2012 released a 17-minute documentary last week called The Road We've Traveled made by Davis Guggeinheim of An Inconvenient Truth. It details some of the president’s achievements in his first term. So I watched it. Then I watched it again, because clearly, it had to be a spoof. According to the video (narrated by avowed Obama-supporter Tom Hanks), President Obama has saved the economy, saved Detroit and the U.S. auto industry, saved health care, took out Osama bin Laden, and created billions of unicorn poop-scooping jobs just by his sheer awesomeness.

I might have made that last one up. Anyway, let’s compare and contrast what this 17-minute campaign ad says against reality, shall we?

Documentary: “Not since the days of Franklin Roosevelt had so much fallen on the shoulders of one president ... and when he faced his country, who looked to him for answers, he would not dwell in blame or dreaming idealism.”

Reality: This is said three minutes into the 17-minute film, after detailing how horrendously awful Obama’s inherited economy was. You know, back when gas was $1.84 a gallon and the unemployment rate was under 8 percent. Speaking of inheriting economies, it seems as though the Obama camp decided to skip right over the doozey that Reagan took over from Carter -- I’m pretty sure that was a worse economy than the one Obama inherited from Bush.

Documentary: “If the auto industry goes down, what happens to America’s manufacturing base, what happens to jobs in America, what happens to the whole Midwest?”

Reality: If the car companies that took bailout money had been allowed to fail, they would’ve been bought at bargain prices by investors, reorganized to make a profit, and would be running along just fine. Instead, they’re now making government-sponsored coal-powered cars that no one wants, and pretending to have paid back their loans. If robbing Peter to pay Paul is what Obama wants to call success, then congratulations, Mr. President. You’re the bestest president ever!

Documentary: Former President Bill Clinton joins the fun to talk about health care. He says, “This is a huge economic issue, because we spend 17 and a half percent of our income on our health care. No other big, wealthy country spends more than 11.8 percent ... and almost all of them have better results than we do.”

Reality: Obamacare is unpopular, unaffordable, rations care, will dissuade capable individuals from pursuing medicine, limits our freedom of choice, and is all around one of the biggest mistakes ever passed into law. The United States has the finest quality health care in the world, available to anyone, regardless of their race, gender, or age, so long as they can pay for the services or have them donated. Isn’t that why so many people from around the world come here for health services?

Documentary: He got Osama.

Reality: This one is true. Credit where credit is due. I’m glad he had a change of heart from when he voted (as Senator Obama) against going to war.

Documentary: The whole thing ends with, “He’s not for quick political gain, but for long term enduring change ... look how far we’ve come, and look forward to the work still to be done. 

Reality: Our country cannot afford another four years of Barack Obama. He spends too much, and limits our abilities to do business. Please, can we elect a president that trusts in Americans, instead of trying to over regulate us? Can we please elect a president that doesn’t have to get Tom Hanks to narrate a documentary that’s so marred with untruth that it’s laughable? Can we please elect someone that understands the value and dignity of earning a dollar, and making free choices as to where to spend it?

The reality is ... Barack Obama has not been good for our economy. It’s time to give someone else a chance.

This post is part of a weekly conversation with our 5 Moms Matter 2012 political bloggers.  To see the original question and what the other writers have to say, read The Road We've Traveled': What Do You Think of Obama's New Video?

 

 

 

 

Image via jamesomalley/Flickr