planned parenthood don't take away my breast examsNews of the aftermath of the Susan G. Komen break from Planned Parenthood is swiftly unfolding. We've told you all about the funding boost Planned Parenthood got as a result. But there have been other real-world ramifications from Monday's stunning announcement.

The backlash is still going on, and it's about more than just money. Komen's reputation and integrity are at stake. And the way things are going, it looks like Komen is paying a high price for its decision.The foundation is also showing signs of splintering from within.

Two affiliates of Susan G. Komen for the Cure are refusing to defund their local Planned Parenthood clinics. Komen Denver and Komen Connecticut will continue funding as usual. Via Twitter, Komen Denver posted a link to an announcement, saying, "Please read, retweet, and share to your networks. Komen Denver is PRIORITIZING women's health over politics." And on Komen Connecticut's Facebook page, they have posted, "We remain committed to our mission of saving lives and ending breast cancer forever." Komen Connecticut says they are talking with Komen HQ about supporters' concerns.

Meanwhile, The Atlantic reported this morning that the decision to de-fund breast cancer screenings through Planned Parenhood caused Komen's top public health official, Mollie Williams, to resign in protest. She's being very discreet about leaving, but in a statement she released, she concludes, "The divide between these two very important organizations saddens me. I am hopeful their passionate and courageous leaders, Nancy Brinker and Cecile Richards, can swiftly resolve this conflict in a manner that benefits the women they both serve."

Another interesting twist: The controversy has actually raised awareness that Planned Parenthood provides women with free or low-cost breast exams. According to a spokeswoman, this has led to an increase in scheduled appointments. Women are getting in those exams while they still can!

One thing seems very clear: This split is dividing loyalties. Women want to support breast cancer research and prevention. And most want to continue funding for Planned Parenthood. It looks like the split is weakening both organizations.

Do you think the Komen/Planned Parenhood split was politically motivated?

 

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