Iran Supports 'Occupy Wall Street' & Beats Innocent Women

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occupy wall streetLeaders in Iran are cheering on the Occupy Wall Street movement, in hopes that it will destroy evil Western capitalism. Gen. Masoud Jazayeri of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard says, “A revolution and a comprehensive movement against corruption in the U.S. is in the making. The last phase will be the collapse of the Western capitalist system.”

The irony of that is that Occupy Wall Street would never be allowed to demonstrate in Iran. Neither would the Tea Party, for that matter. In Iran, dissent is not patriotic -- it’s illegal. Even portraying the country in a negative light in a film is punishable by jail time and lashings.

Iranian actress Marzieh Vafamehr has been sentenced to 90 lashes and a year in prison for her work in My Tehran for Sale, a movie that depicts Iran in a negative light. The 2009 film is about a young woman who is forced to live a secret life in Tehran after authorities ban her theatre work.

In the movie, Ms. Vafamehr appears with a shaved head and no headscarf, and even (gasp!) drinks alcohol. Both are big no-nos in the religion of Islam and illegal in Iran. There is also a scene (which can be seen in the trailer) in which young people dancing at a nightclub are captured by the police and beaten.

Sure, Iran. Convince the world that you’re anti-violence by beating a woman for depicting government officials beating women. See how that works out for you.

The theocracy in Iran has a long history of employing brutal violence to subdue and control the public. This is a regime that stones rape victims to death for ‘adultery.’ They kill Christians that have converted from Islam. They hang teenage girls for defending themselves against a rapist. 

The Iranian government is violent, oppressive, and downright awful. People involved with a cause supported by Iran should ask him or herself what the heck they’re doing there.

I’m looking at you, Wall Street Occupiers. 


Image via BlaisOne/Flickr

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