Not Everything Ron Paul Says Is Stupid

Maressa Brown
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Ron PaulSure, Rep. Ron Paul, the notorious Republican from Texas, has said some pretty crazy things. He's made statements about the separation (or lack of separation) of church and state that are totally wackadoo, e.g., "The Founding Fathers envisioned a robustly Christian yet religiously tolerant America, with churches serving as vital institutions that would eclipse the state in importance." He's also made racist, insane-o remarks, claiming that most black men are criminals. But, let's put that aside for a moment, shall we, and focus on ... the economy.

Because he was actually rather lucid on the floor of the House of Representatives yesterday, when delivering a passionate speech about where budget cuts should be made: NPR or the war in Afghanistan?

See, Paul considers himself an old-school Republican, AKA he's fiscally conservative. (These days it seems like it's much more about wanting to spend BIG on things that derail progress, like oil and war.) Now, Paul is really sticking to his core beliefs in this cry to get his fellow Republicans on board with putting a dent in the budget where it belongs -- by defunding Afghanistan over NPR.

His one speech really seemed to illustrate the obvious divide between fiscal conservatives, who genuinely want to see some change in the federal debt, and social ones, who would be happy to run home to constituents and say, "Hey, look! We really got those liberals by cutting off money that goes to their objective journalism and abortion providers!"

Paul made the VERY valid point that the money saved by yanking the rug out from under NPR is paltry compared to what they could save by pulling out of Afghanistan.

The very most they might save is $10 million. And that's their claim to fame for slashing the budget. At the same time they won't consider for a minute cutting a real significant amount of money. All empires end for fiscal reasons because they spread themselves too far around the world, and that's what we're facing!

All you have to do is look at the numbers. Here are the facts: NPR funding is one ten-thousandth of 1 percent of the federal budget ... How much does the Fed spend on the "fruitless venture" -- as Paul puts it -- in Afghanistan? That we should have ended YEARS AGO? That at least 60 percent of Americans believe is not worth fighting? About $10 billion per MONTH!!! Every day we stay in Afghanistan, we add more than $325 million to our debt. And NPR (PBS, Planned Parenthood, etc.) is the big deal we have to axe in an emergency session?

Are these people out of their minds??

In the end, the House voted 228-192 to cut NPR's federal funding, while the resolution calling for the end of military operations in Afghanistan DIED by an insane vote of 93-321 against. (How that reflects the opinion of the American people is beyond me!) Thankfully, it's unlikely that the NPR vote will hold any water. It would have to pass through the Senate, and then through Obama, and that's HIGHLY unlikely. (Fingers crossed.) But in the meantime, here we are, 10 years after 9/11 -- still in Afghanistan. Throwing money into the desert.

It's worrisome enough that we're still there, that the House can't get their priorities straight or represent the real sentiments of the American people. But to think Ron Paul is the only Republican in that House with his head on straight right now?? Now, that's terrifying.

Check out Ron Paul's speech in front of the House from CSPAN yesterday:

Do you agree with Ron Paul?


Image via YouTube

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