Avoid the Daylight Savings Time iPhone Bug

Suzanne Murray
2

iphone daylight savings alarmSunday, November 7, at 2 a.m. officially marks the end of Daylight Savings Time, which means we set the clocks back -- and gain an extra hour. Unfortunately kids don't seem to comprehend the relevance of this (good luck trying to point out that the clock says it's only 6 a.m.) -- and, apparently, neither do iPhones. The latter caused major problems in Europe last Monday, when that continent set its clocks back. The same could happen here, unless you follow this advice.

Apparently, the internal clocks on the devices will adjust the time without a hitch. The problem is with the alarm clock. If you've got it set as a recurrent alarm, it won't adjust for Daylight Savings Time and your alarm will end up going off an hour later than it should have -- that's what happened to all those Europeans who showed up an hour late for work last week (they set their clocks back on Monday, a work day for most).

Apple has acknowledged the bug and advises the following:

  • iPhone and iPod touch owners should change their alarm settings
  • iOS owners with a recurrent alarm should set the repeat interval to Never and use a daily alarm
  • After November 7th has passed, the bug will no longer affect recurring alarms and everything will return to normal
  • Devices affected by the bug include the iPod touch (4th generation), iPod touch (3rd generation), iPod touch (2nd generation), iPhone 3G, iPhone4, and the iPhone 3GS.

Have you prepared yourself against the iPhone Daylight Savings glitch?


Image via ceejayoz/Flickr

Read More