Debrahlee Lorenzana is a beautiful, hot, and sexy woman who filed a lawsuit against Citibank last summer for discriminating against her for her looks.

The charge? She was "too sexy" for her job. Her bosses told her that the shape of her figure was distracting and gave her a list of clothing items she would not be allowed to wear: turtlenecks, pencil skirts, fitted suits, and three-inch heels. Then she was fired.

But don't try to give her attention for her looks. There is no doubt, the woman is a straight-up knockout, but she has decided to turn down offers from all different Internet companies and entertainment sites that wanted her to pose. This includes Playboy:

I don't want to be famous, I try to stay away from that. I just want to be an example, that's all. If people in the future still remember my name, I want to be remembered as a woman who stood up for her rights.

The problem is, it's hard to buy her story.

While it might look initially good that she's turning down the offers, if she's involved in a lawsuit, it would look very bad if she suddenly decided to pose nude, especially when she's complaining that she was discriminated against for looks.

Also, when reports came out in June, we all assumed that her bodacious bod was homegrown. Turns out? It's not.

At 26, Lorenzana took part in a four-part TV series, which aired in 2003. At the time, the 26-year-old was preparing for her fourth plastic surgery -- a boob job that she hoped would make her a "huge, double-D" with "very perky" breasts.

"I love plastic surgery," Lorenzana said. "I think it is the best thing that ever happened."

At the time, she already had had a tummy tuck, another boob job, and liposuction. A woman who has that much plastic surgery isn't asking to be sexually harassed, she doesn't "deserve" it, but she does have to take more responsibility for it than a woman whose assets appear naturally.

Being "curvy" or outwardly sexual can be a curse. The discrimination Lorenzana describes is very real, but she also deliberately sought a figure that would net a man who would be "happy because I'll be looking like a little Playboy Playmate."

Maybe she changed her mind and wanted to be taken seriously. Maybe she really doesn't want attention or fame because of her looks. But then why wear low-cut things and pencil skirts? You can't claim ignorance or lack of control over your sexuality when you were the one who created it.

A more likely scenario: She knows how bad it would look for the lawsuit if she did pose nude and she's looking for a big payout.

Do you think she is manipulating things?

 

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