White House Party Crashers: Now Impersonating Authors!

Julie Marsh

michaela salahi tareq salahi

Tareq and Michaele Salahi testifying on the White House security breach

There are a whole lot of books out there that shouldn't have been written, such as Sophie Kinsella's insipid Shopaholic series, Bill O'Reilly's guide Kids Are Americans Too (which almost made me embarrassed for him), and every bodice-ripper on the shelf. I'm an occasional fan of fluff, but even beach reads ought to be, well, readable.

Thanks to the White House Party Crashers, Tareq and Michaele Salahi, we'll have some new tripe to disdain soon: They're writing a book.

I've no idea how they plan to parlay the "behind the scenes" details of eluding Secret Service security checks into an entire volume priced at $24.95. Really, what else is there to tell that hasn't already been reported? These people are notorious publicity seekers; I highly doubt they've held anything back if they thought it might get them more attention.

But according to the New York Post, book collaborator Diane Dimond confides that "the Salahis' story is much bigger than what's been reported," including "genuine intrigue" with twists that "can be traced right back to the White House."

Oh, come on. They're a couple of well-dressed smooth talkers who've got pictures of themselves with the President and a starring role in The Real Housewives of DC (which goes to show how unreal these reality show housewives really are). I'm skeptical as to whether there's any sort of mystery worth unraveling here.

Salahis, some advice: Just because you can write a book doesn't mean you should. Plenty of books out there just plain suck. I'm afraid yours will be one of them.

Image via Chip Somodevilla/Getty

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