Phoebe Prince: Bullies Arrested for Driving Her to Suicide

Jeanne Sager
10


Flickr photo by Anonymous Account
Three months after Phoebe Prince hanged herself in her Massachusetts home, nine teens were arrested on a variety of charges with one common denominator.

The teens -- three of them juveniles -- allegedly bullied high school freshman Phoebe Prince to the point of no return. Prince's suicide has been linked to charges of statutory rape, harassment and assault with a dangerous weapon.

Stories of kids quite literally bullied to death are growing.

This time last year, a set of Ohio parents were filing suit against their school district after learning bullies told their son "Why don't you go home and kill yourself?" He did.

The moms of two boys, each just 11, who killed themselves after suffering severe bullying appeared on Oprah last spring to kick-start a national conversation on stopping the bullies.

It didn't stop.

Phoebe Prince had just moved from Ireland to South Hadley High School in Massachusetts. The "new girl" suffered at the hands of classmates typing comments like "Irish whore" on Facebook and apparently statutory rape and more.

Prince's isn't the only tragedy to come at the hands of bullies, cyberbullies included. Yet charges, as a People article written shortly after her January suicide pointed out, are rarely filed in criminal courts. There seems to be an overwhelming desire in communities to let kids off the hook, determining that dealing with death as a result of their actions is enough of a punishment. Or perhaps prosecutors don't want to come off as being insensitive to children?

Either course has done little more than allow bullies to continue their reign of terror with impunity.

Until now, that is.

The nine teens in the Phoebe Prince case are set to show up in court (date to be determined), where they'll face reckoning for their alleged involvement in a torturous campaign that claimed the life of a child.

Do you think it's about time or too little, too late?

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