A Bad Year For Tomatoes?

Kim Conte
9

late blight hurts tomato gardensIt's not just the upside-down tomato plants that aren't producing this year. (Remember that conversation?) Growing tomatoes right-side-up has been harder than usual this year due to an explosive outbreak of a plant disease called late blight, which is attacking home gardens and commercial fields across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions. Even Martha Stewart got tomato blight—in fact, she lost 70 percent of her tomato crop this year!

Late blight was particularly aggressive (and early!) this year due to the abnormally wet and cool June weather.

So what does this mean for tomato-lovers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic parts of the country?

Tomatoes are hard to come by this year, and the ones you do find will be pricier—up to 20 percent pricier than they were at this time last year.

Have your tomatoes ever been hit by late blight? Have you noticed a shortage of tomatoes this year?

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