A Money-Saving Travel Tip That Works Like a Charm

wing of a planeIf you’re planning some holiday travel abroad, there’s a simple ticket-buying hack you’re going to want to know about. It’s a trick so simple and so effective, you’ll feel like the cat that ate the canary when you try it! At least, that’s how I felt when I just used it to purchase a ticket for some December travel.

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In short, it all comes down to using foreign currency conversion rates to your advantage. Let’s say you’re traveling to Thailand and you want to book flights to get around within that country. They’re more expensive if you book them from your home in the U.S., and much less expensive if you wait until you get there to book. But! There’s a way of getting around all that waiting, uncertainty, and last-minute booking: When you purchase your ticket, simply make it look like you’re buying it from a computer in Thailand!

First, you may want to use an aggregator site like kayak.com as a starting point to find the best price for your ticket. Then head over to the airline’s site to book directly. However, that's where you'll take one extra step: Find the place on the airline’s website that allows you to select your country. Then, choose the destination country (instead of U.S.A.). That will allow you to make your purchase in the local currency and typically save some money!

This just worked for me when booking my flights for my husband and me within our holiday destination country: Colombia. For flights between Cartagena and Bogota, I booked directly on Avianca’s site using Colombia as my home country. That allowed me to complete the transaction in COP (Colombian pesos), for a total of $123.66 converted to U.S. dollars. For comparison, the exact same flights purchased in U.S. dollars would have come out to $145.20, for a savings of $21.54 with barely an extra click necessary. And the smug insider feeling? Priceless!

Note this may also work for international flights -- poke around and see what luck you have.

Bon voyage!

 

Image via Skyseeker/Flickr

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