Hurricane Sandy Gas Shortage: When & Where You Can Fill Up

This Just In 3

pumping gasMore than a week after Hurricane Sandy absolutely pummelled parts of New York and New Jersey, many people are still living in a state of disarray and trying to come to terms with how to pick up the pieces after the devastation.

And while there are a whole host of problems and limitations that people are dealing with, the current gasoline shortage has to be one of the most stressful situations.

From people not being able to leave their cities and towns because their cars are running on empty, to waiting in hours for one tank of gas and only being able to get it on certain days because it's being rationed, to people who still don't have power and can't even run their generators because of the lack of gas -- this is a HUGE issue right now.

And as we get ready to kick off another weekend, odds are good that even more people will be on the roads. Here's what we know as far as where and when you can get gas in New York and New Jersey right now.

Gas Rationing is in effect, and motorists are allowed to fill up every other day in New Jersey, New York City and Long Island. License plates with odd numbers are permitted to fill up on odd-numbered days, and plates that end with even numbers or a zero will have their turn on even-numbered days. People who have vanity plates without numbers are considered odd-numbered, and those who show up at the stations with portable gas cans are exempt from the rationing plan -- as are taxis, buses, cabs, commercial, and emergency vehicles.

There are also a few websites where you can check gas availability for particular stations in your area and also see which stations are open. They include GasBuddy.com, ExxonMobil.com, and Hess Express.

As for things returning to normal, Mayor Bloomberg said it may take another two weeks. In New Jersey, Governer Christie is hoping to be able to re-evaluate the gas rationing plan by this weekend.

Do you have any other tips for NJ or NY residents on where to find gas?

 

Image via futureatlas.com/Flickr

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