If you live in New York City or know anything about the city, you probably know one thing: New Yorkers tend to have small apartments! Yeah, you hear about the gigantic penthouse apartments overlooking Central Park, but trust me, that is the exception, not the rule. Most of us city dwellers live in closet-sized apartments. And Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who hates big sodas, doesn't like big apartments either. Sure, Bloomie, you're a gazillionaire with plenty of space, what do you care? Current city regulations say that apartments are supposed to be 450-square-feet but the mayor wants to allow builders to go one third smaller with his "microapartment initiative." Just what we need in the city -- smaller apartments. Not!

The pilot project would allow apartments that are 275 to 300 square feet. And they aren't exactly dirt cheap, renting for $1400 a month. Well, at least at that size, you won't see too many New Yorkers on Hoarders.

And color me crazy because there are already apartments in the city that are smaller than the regulations supposedly allow. One couple live in a $1500 a month 240-square foot apartment in Brooklyn. They describe it as "dungeon-esque" and I don't think they mean that in a 50 Shades of Grey way. The woman, Erin Boyle, says she and her fiance, James Casey, only make sure to buy things they "really love." And girlfriend must really love her fiance if she can live with him in 240 square feet.

Another woman, Felice Cohen, lives on the Upper East Side in a 90-square-foot apartment. It's just 12 feet long and 7 feet wide. And she didn't fall down a rabbit hole! She pays $700 a month to live steps from Lincoln Center and Central Park. That's not a bad deal here in the city. Even if Felice did suffer a panic attack the first night sleeping in her shoebox loft bed. She also has no kitchen. But she's got a toaster oven! Lucky for Felice, she happens to be a professional organizer.

While smaller apartments for the city's 1.8 million single people isn't a bad idea, I think the rents should be regulated somehow. Because knowing this city, they'll soon cost as much as a three-bedroom anyway.

Could you live in this apartment?

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