6 DIY Home Security Options to Keep You Safe

Juliet Farmer

Front door lockYou don't have to outfit your home like Fort Knox to feel safe.

In fact, it turns out you don't even have to spend loads of money on monthly security monitoring, so long as you're willing to do some DIY home security installation.

From high-tech gadgetry that you can purchase, install, and monitor yourself to low-tech ideas -- there's a home security package for every budget.

According to a recent New York Times story, DIY home security is growing in popularity. And why not? There's something to be said for taking control of your home security and that sense of satisfaction when you know you've done all you can on the home safety front.

Here are six DIY home security options (priced lowest to highest):

  1. For the price of a sturdy piece of wood, you can block any sliding door or window from being opened from the outside. Measure the window track when the window is open, and purchase a piece of wood that will fit in the slot, yet is sturdy enough not to break with force. This is old-school home security, but it works.
  2. For windows that open vertically, try stacking pennies on the top of the windowsill (so that if opened, the pennies will scatter and create noise). A stick of wood will also work in these windows, but it needs to be wedged in tight enough that it won't fall out on its own.
  3. For less than $10 per window, GE SmartHome makes easy to install, battery-operated wireless window alarms.
  4. For $16, GE SmartHome also has a battery-operated door stopper alarm that you can even take with you when you travel.
  5. If you spend about $60, you can get a Q-See Wireless Security System that includes five door sensors, one motion detector, and two key chain remotes.
  6. If you have a lot of people coming and going in your home and don't want to give out a key to everyone, try the Schlage Wireless Keypad Deadbolt, which allows you to unlock your door with a web-enabled computer or cell phone; program the lock to send automatic text or email updates so you'll always know who's home; add, change, or delete user codes in seconds from the online interface; and assign up to 19 personalized codes for everyone in your household. This one will set you back about $200 (available online at Lowe's), but it will afford you peace of mind that everyone and their brother doesn't have a key to your house.

How's your home security?


Image via G & A Sattler/Flickr

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