Would You Try It? E-Cigarettes

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e cigarettes

Courtesy of E-Cigarettes

It looks exactly like the real thing.

Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, glow red with fire, have a brown filter, and smokers can take a puff to fill their bodies with pure liquid nicotine.

The CEO of e-cigarette maker, Smoking Everywhere, says the ciggies are comparable to the nicotine patch--only better. E-cigarettes give smokers the oral fixation that they love without the harmful effects of tobacco.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) isn't so sure. They're trying to importation of e-cigs until scientific studies show they're safe and effective.

But e-cigs are already out on the U.S. market.

Smoking Everywhere says they're "pretty sure" the product is safe based on lab tests in Europe.

E-cigarettes run on a battery. The smoker inhales it just like a typical cigarette, and the battery warms the liquid nicotine stores in the plastic filter, according to a story on CNN. The combination of heat and liquid creates the vapor or smoke puff when exhaled.

One doctor was quoted as saying that nicotine isn't the cancer-causing agent that tobacco is, but inhaling pure nicotine might be dangerous. Still, experts agree that this idea is promising. They'd like to study e-cigarette safety more.

Most are sold online or at mall kiosks. E-cigarettes are popular in the U.K, Sweden and Brazil. They're not cheap--getting started with one e-cigarette, batteries and cartridges will cost $149. One cartridge lasts as long as 30 to 40 cigarettes and costs $12.50.

As a former smoker, the naughty side of me thinks these are interesting. See what other CafeMoms think about e-cigarettes in the Questions section. But I'm skeptical. Are e-cigarettes better than real ones? I'd definitely ask my doctor.

What do you think? Would you try e-cigarettes?

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