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  • Baskin was walking back to her car and found it plastered with flyers shaming her for parking in a handicap spot.

    "There are legit handicapped people who need this parking space," one paper taped to her car read. "We have seen you and your friend come and go and there is nothing handicapped about either of you." The flyer continued to shame Baskin as a "selfish, terrible person" who musn't be handicapped because she can walk.

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  • But just because she isn't what we traditionally imagine when we think of "handicapped" doesn't mean she isn't battling an invisible illness.

    "This is my car and I am legally allowed to park in handicap spaces due to cancer treatment and exhaustion," she wrote in her post, which was featured on the Love What Matters page on Facebook.

    Sure, you'd never know by just passing her on the street. But as Baskin put it, "Just because you can't physically observe something does not mean that a person is not feeling it."

  • Baskin is currently undergoing radiation treatment for a grade 2 ependymoma tumor on her brain stem.

    She has just a week and a half left of treatment, and things are looking good. Externally, she "looks fine," except for a small speech impediment. 

    "I am not asking for sympathy, but just awareness that everyone is fighting their own battles, whether you know it or not," she wrote.

  • Baskin's story encouraged other people to share their own experiences of being judged by others based on their appearance.

    "I have congestive heart failure," someone else wrote. "I have good days and bad days. No one needs to question me by looks alone of what disability I have."

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    It's an important reminder that there's always more than meets the eye. "Be kind to people," Baskin wrote. "Make people cry tears of joy, and not frustration or sadness. Love one another."

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