Plus-Size Blogger Blasts the Idea That Wearing a Bathing Suit Is 'Brave'

jessica kaneWhen women take selfies without a dot of concealer or swipe of lip gloss, we call them "brave." When they wear shorts in hot weather despite bearing cellulite, they're also apparently deserving of the same word we use for soldiers.

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And when Jessica Kane, founder of the plus-size blogger network Skorch, flaunted her fabulous figure in a bathing suit on the beach, then shared the snap on social media, people called her -- yep, you guessed it! -- brave. But that's not a word she's readily embracing. For good reason.

Check out the 35-year-old mom's amazing response.

THIS WAS NOT BRAVE. I've been told how brave I am for not having a coverup, but going with out a wrap would only take...

Posted by Jessica Kane on Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Right on, Jessica! She recently shared with us even more about her reaction, explaining the difference between bravery and body confidence, and offering words of wisdom for women of all different sizes.

Why do you think people mistake body confidence for "bravery"?
I think body confidence is perceived as bravery, because we are told consistently -- and I mean over 6,000 times a DAY -- that we should be X. Unfortunately, that little box is so tiny that no one feels they can fit into it, thus creating an environment where one feels extremely courageous going out and obliterating that little perfect box. Like we're being scandalous, but it only feels that way if you allow yourself to drink the "everyone must like/approve/be jealous of you" Koolaide.

How do you think we can change the conversation in society so what you did isn't seen as "brave"?
The conversation will only change when seeing a girl like me isn't such a "thing," so we need more body diversity in media and advertising. There is a body empowerment army ensuring this will continue happening -- like my friend and SKORCH cover model Tess Holliday, who was signed as a model at a size 22. 

Retailers control the conversation the most, however they are too scared. ... The fear of being accused of glorifying being overweight paralyzes their marketing decisions. At present, the only way you're allowed to be fat and happy is if you add the disclaimer of your healthy eating habits or workout. 

What actions have you taken to promote progress for plus-size visibility in the fashion world?
I'm so beyond proud to take my mission to the next level as Creative Director of a new plus retailer on the same mission, CoolGalBlue.com. Under my direction, all models are regular women (no pro models), all images have the model's measurements, and [we have] a 100 percent no body edit Photoshop guarantee.  

What do you advise women who feel insecure and afraid to walk around on the beach without being covered up, because they're worried about what people think about how they look - no matter how they look?
To those women who are scared and truly terrified to go out and wear a swimsuit, I want to stress that the fear comes from mental abuse, which is exactly what fat-shaming is, and you must seek out a support system of empowering women, give yourself daily affirmations to counteract the negative .... and remind yourself that if you were in a car accident and died, that the last thing you cared about wouldn't be some bully hating your cellulite.

What do you hope people take away from all of this?
I hope my post and decade-long mission in body empowerment brings awareness to what should ACTUALLY be a priority and require our bravery.

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Bravo to Jessica for starting and continuing a conversation about body image, body confidence, and beauty that can only seve to help SO many women happier.

Instead of "brave," how would you describe Jessica's mission?



Image via Jessica Kane

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