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Maria Shriver

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Although we may not always like to admit mom is right, she can be a source of some of the best advice around. We asked members of the CafeMom community to share their favorite words of wisdom from their own mothers:

• Blessed are the peacemakers.

• It's better to get there late than not get there at all.

• If you want it done right, do it yourself.

• Not everything has to be perfect: Sometimes "good enough" is good enough.

• Give yourself 24 hours to be upset, then get up and get yourself together and do what needs to be done to make things better.

• It's ok to say you're sorry ... and it's ok to be wrong.

• Make fun memories every day!

• You might not feel like you're over-the-moon in love with your baby at first. Don't feel bad. It will come to you soon enough and it doesn't make you a bad mom.

• Enjoy your kids when they are little because they grow too fast!

• It's okay to put the baby down and walk away to take a deep breath.

• The way you speak to your child will become their inner voice, so choose you words and tone wisely.

• If you don't take care of yourself, you won't be your best for the kids.

• Watch how a man treats his mother because that's how he'll treat you.

• Siblings will fight, but don't worry -- they won't kill each other!

• It's important to be beautiful on the inside and not just worry about the outside.

• Don't ever go to bed with your makeup on, and always use moisturizer after washing your face!

• Don't let others determine your worth.

• Sometimes, you have to pick your battles.

• Treat people with the same kindness and respect, from the janitor up to the CEO. You are no better or worse than anyone.

• Never miss an opportunity to kiss your kids and tell them you love them!

Maria Shriver, daughter of the late Eunice Kennedy Shriver -- who founded the Special Olympics in 1968 -- is also proud to share her mother’s legacy. “The gift my mother gave me was the gift of possibility,” she says. “The gift that I could do anything I wanted to do. She made me feel what it’s like for somebody to be your champion. It wasn’t a matter of ‘Can I?’ or ‘Should I?’ It was just, ‘You can, you must, you will!’”