Creepy Zombies Save Heart Attack Victim in Awesomely Bizarre CPR Ad (VIDEO)

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The woman -- blonde, bedraggled, and terrified -- is on the run in some sort of post-apocalyptic nightmare scenario. Fighter jets scream over the abandon city ruins and air raid sirens blare in the background as she comes face to face with the gruesome figure of an undead human, hungry for her tender living flesh. She fights him off with a well-placed blow to the head, only to be surrounded by an entire pack of the things -- at which point she clutches her chest and drops bonelessly to the ground, the victim of a stress-induced heart attack.

No, it's not a scene from the upcoming season of The Walking Deadit's a public service announcement from the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada. And thanks to what the zombies do next, it's officially the best PSA video I have EVER SEEN EVER.

See, the zombies don't want to eat her if she's dead, so they have to revive her. That's where the actual message behind this bizarrely compelling mini-film comes into play. A zombie is shown pawing at a cellphone ("When someone suffers a cardiac arrest, call 911"), then another begins chest compressions ("Push hard and fast about twice every second"). The third message pauses onscreen for maximum effect: "Don't hesitate. You can't do harm."

Finally, the woman is revived. Not that there's, ah, a happy ending for her, what with the slobbering ravenous living dead and all. But the tagline -- "CPR makes you Undead" -- is there to remind us that in a zombie-free situation, her life could have been saved with a few simple steps.

Check it out:

The video is part of 'The Undeading' event, where The Heart and Stroke Foundation are trying to break the Guinness World Record for the largest CPR training session taking place at one time in the same place. The clip has been viewed over 400,000 times to date, so it seems like it's been a highly effective way to get the word out. Zombies make everything better, man.

What do you think about this video? Do you think making it into a mini horror film made it more watchable than a straight PSA?

Image via YouTube

healthy habits, stress