waterIf you've been feeling blue lately – down in the dumps, irritable, exhausted, distracted, maybe a little headache-y – might I humbly suggest a simple possible solution: Stand up, walk to the kitchen, snag a tall glass, pour yourself some water, and drink it up.

Glug, glug, glug …

There, better now? A new study, published in the Journal of Nutrition, has found that even mild dehydration (say, from not drinking enough fluids to compensate for hydration lost during exercise) can affect women's moods, their ability to concentrate, and their energy level -- and give them headaches as well.

I'm guessing most of us probably don't find the results of that study terribly surprising. We all know we're supposed to be vigilant about drinking lots of water. We are 60% water, after all – and drinking adequate amounts of water affects almost every part of us. It helps regulate our body temperature and lubricates our joints. It helps dissolve minerals and carries oxygen and nutrients to the cells in our bodies. It moistens the mouth, eyes, and nose; protects our organs and tissues; helps the kidneys and liver flush out toxins and waste; and, as the euphemism goes, keeps us regular.

In other words, water? It's the drink of life. So why is it so hard for us to remember to drink it?

Honestly, we all know the rule about drinking eight glasses a day. (The Mayo Clinic actually recommends that the average woman drinking in a temperate climate should drink about 2.2 liters, or 9 cups, of water and other water-containing foods and beverages each day.) Why do so many of us fail to do something we know is healthy – and is so easy and so cheap?

I guess the answer to that question is different for every woman. But me? I'm hereby vow to suck down the recommended amount of H20 every day. Excuse me while I go fill my glass.

Will this study prompt you to drink more water?

 

Image via Greg Riegler Photography/Flickr