Calling Demi Moore 'Too Thin' Is Just as Rude as Calling Her Fat

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demi moorePardon my language, but I imagine the past few months of Demi Moore's life have been a shit show. Not only did she have to deal with a very public divorce, she had to deal with the fact that the man she thought she knew and loved was a lying, cheating demon. Stressful isn't even the word.

And to add insult to injury, throughout the weeks following the announcement of their divorce, every blog, legitimate news source, and rag mag featured photos of a particularly gaunt Moore, and offered commentary about how thin and frail she looked. Hell, in a recent interview with Bazaar, Demi said that even her friends were saying things like, "You're too thin, and you don't look good."

Wow. That's, like, really effing rude. Just as rude as saying, "You're too fat, and you don't look good."

Everybody knows that a stressful event in life -- a break-up, a death, a job loss -- is "the world's best diet." For the most part, when people are anxious, nervous, and worried, they don't eat. They just stress. From the outside, it might look like the person is enjoying their newfound jeans size, but I know for a fact they'd give anything just to have things normal.

Usually, I consider myself to be on the smaller side. Most of my family is. In fact, I look huge compared to my tiny, tiny grandmother. When I'm stressed out, though -- I.E. when I broke up with my boyfriend of five years, or when my mother was battling cancer -- I'm just going to say it, I'm downright minuscule. And it's not cute. I feel gaunt, old-looking, and the circles under my eyes are more pronounced and exaggerated than ever. I hate it. But what I hate even more is people pointing out how thin I look. Particularly since the tone is never a "Hey, you look great!" one. It's one with a tinge of disgust.

This, of course, is usually followed by a "covert" (read: totally obvious) monitoring of what I'm eating -- or should I say, not eating. Sorry, but when I'm super stressed I feel borderline nauseous, and I just don't want to eat. I'm not starving myself. And I don't need anyone insinuating that I am.

We would never point out the opposite to those who resort to the other extreme -- eating more than usual -- when they feel anxious. We would never say to a hurt or depressed friend. "Hey, you look too fat, and you don't look good" to someone who already felt like crap. That would only make then feel worse. Just as it does when you tell someone they look too thin.

Have you ever been insulted by someone saying you look too thin?

 

Image via Harper's Bazaar

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