Daylight Savings Time 2011 & the Upside of Losing an Hour

Kim Conte
11

alarm clockI'm often grumpy at the start of Daylight Saving Time knowing I'm about to lose a precious hour of sleep when the clocks spring forward at 2 a.m. early Sunday morning. (I may be laid back about something things, but sleep definitely isn't one of them.)

A bit of reflection on the event this year, however, has allowed me to see some positives in the seasonal changing of the clocks. Let's take a look, shall we?

Well, for one thing, the start of Daylight Saving Time means we're about to have one more hour of daylight each day. In other words, when I get home for work they'll still be a bit of light left to do something active and take advantage of the (hopefully) spring-like weather. How do I spend that hour? I like to do something physical outside -- walking the dog, running through the park -- anything I don't particularly feel safe doing during when it's starting to get dark.

Plus, the start of Daylight Saving Time  means more time in the sun and less time, say, in front of the TV. And who doesn't love the benefits of (moderate and safe!) sun exposure -- an increase in Vitamin D to prevent cancer and keep us healthy, not the mention the fact that sunlight helps to stave off seasonal affective disorder. (And after this long and dreary winter, I need all the help I can get.)

Also, there's the added positive of feeling good that by observing Daylight Saving Time, we're helping the planet by saving energy and natural resources (although not everyone would agree with this).

Finally, it means warmer weather is -- or at least should be -- just around the corner.

And for all of that, I can certainly sacrifice an hour of sleep.

Are you a Daylight Saving Time lover or hater?

 

Image via alancleaver_2000/Flickr

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