Does Mel Gibson Deserve Friends?

Jeanne Sager

Mel GibsonMel Gibson has successfully ruined his sexy older man appeal this year and made What Women Want forever unwatchable. He's even ruined the guiltiest of pleasures -- watching his butt wiggle in Lethal Weapons 1 through 37.

So I'm having a hard time letting Jodie Foster's warm and gushy Mel love envelop me.

In case you haven't heard, the child-star-turned-director is Mel's one remaining bestie in all of Hollywood. And she's sticking to him like glue.

Foster told MORE:

"When you love a friend, you don't abandon them when they are struggling. Of course, Mel is an undeniably gifted actor and director .... But, more importantly, he is and has been a true and loyal friend. I hope I can help him get through this dark moment."

Aww, Jodie, did you have to hit us there? Suddenly, casting Gibson as a one-sided villain in this melodrama with Oksana Grigorieva is near impossible. He's just a guy going through a rough time, and somebody still finds him lovable.

Point of fact: even murderers on death row have a mom, a dad, and probably someone who knew them before they went to pot. It's a sad commentary on humanity if a major screw-up completely erases every good thing you've ever done.

Writing off a friend has to happen at times. When they're hurting you at every turn, sometimes you have to bail for your own sake. But when they're not hurting you, when their problems are with other people, breaking up with them turns them into the wronged party.

You're fighting someone else's battle, and giving up on someone who could really use a friend. Sanctimony has no place in friendship.

Which isn't to say that you have to agree with your friend. Or tell them what they did was wrong. A good friend, I daresay, calls you on your BS. And then sticks around to help you fix it.

We all screw up. It's called being human.

So if Jodie shouldn't be friends with Mel, what does that say about the rest of us?

Do we deserve friends?


Image via Made in Hollywood/Flickr

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