Kelly Bensimon Comes Clean on 'Crazy'

Cynthia Dermody

Kelly Bensimon poses for Harper's BazaarA psychiatrist recently told The Stir that Real Housewife Kelly Bensimon's problem is paranoid personality disorder: "She's very concerned about hidden motives and that she's going to be exploited. She isolates herself socially. Even though she's pretty outgoing, she has no real connection with anyone and gets irrationally hostile."

That's a very polite and clinical rephrase of what the rest of the world says: "She's a nutcase."

At long last Bensimon defends herself, along with this appropriately feisty boxing gloves spread in the August issue of Harper's Bazaar.

Bensimon insists she's not crazy -- would you have guessed otherwise? She insists she's just "unpredictable." And if you read the full article, you'll realize she's also incredibly smart at marketing herself within the lunatic persona she's created for herself. She often explains it to her daughters: "Your mom gets paid to engage in inappropriate behavior."

As for the now famous "Crazy Episode" in St. John's, which clinched the crazy deal for many viewers and got the highest ratings of any episode, Bensimon thought her behavior at the dinner table was a good example for her kids. She blamed the entire confrontation on arch-enemy Frankel and the rest of the Housewives, and that her walking out helped to show her daughters that "being mean is not okay. If you’re in a situation like this, walk out."

She's not in therapy, nor does she feel she needs to be, though she admits that everything about herself bothers the other women. That alone should be a clue that something is a little off with her, but Bensimon just runs with that in a positive direction. "Crazy Kelly" gets more Google hits than "Sweet Kelly." People are listening to Crazy Kelly and her messages about bullying and safe sex.

And as long as they are listening, Bensimon will keep talking. And punching.

Does this interview change your mind about Kelly Bensimon? Do you still think she has a psychological disorder?


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